Vocational Education Teachers, Postsecondary

Description

Teach or instruct vocational or occupational subjects at the postsecondary level (but at less than the baccalaureate) to students who have graduated or left high school. Includes correspondence school, industrial, and commercial instructors; and adult education teachers and instructors who prepare persons to operate industrial machinery and equipment and transportation and communications equipment. Teaching may take place in public or private schools whose primary business is education or in a school associated with an organization whose primary business is other than education.

Tasks

  • Supervise and monitor students' use of tools and equipment.
  • Observe and evaluate students' work to determine progress, provide feedback, and make suggestions for improvement.
  • Determine training needs of students or workers.
  • Administer oral, written, or performance tests to measure progress and to evaluate training effectiveness.
  • Prepare reports and maintain records such as student grades, attendance rolls, and training activity details.
  • Conduct on-the-job training classes or training sessions to teach and demonstrate principles, techniques, procedures, or methods of designated subjects.
  • Integrate academic and vocational curricula so that students can obtain a variety of skills.
  • Develop curricula and plan course content and methods of instruction.
  • Develop teaching aids such as instructional software, multimedia visual aids, or study materials.
  • Participate in conferences, seminars, and training sessions to keep abreast of developments in the field, and integrate relevant information into training programs.
  • Present lectures and conduct discussions to increase students' knowledge and competence using visual aids, such as graphs, charts, videotapes, and slides.
  • Supervise independent or group projects, field placements, laboratory work, or other training.
  • Select and assemble books, materials, supplies, and equipment for training, courses, or projects.
  • Prepare outlines of instructional programs and training schedules and establish course goals.
  • Provide individualized instruction and tutorial or remedial instruction.
  • Advise students on course selection, career decisions, and other academic and vocational concerns.
  • Acquire, maintain, and repair laboratory equipment and tools.
  • Serve on faculty and school committees concerned with budgeting, curriculum revision, and course and diploma requirements.
  • Review enrollment applications and correspond with applicants to obtain additional information.
  • Arrange for lectures by experts in designated fields.

Skills

Equipment Maintenance
Performing routine maintenance on equipment and determining when and what kind of maintenance is needed.
Repairing
Repairing machines or systems using the needed tools.
Installation
Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.
Programming
Writing computer programs for various purposes.

Abilities

Spatial Orientation
The ability to know your location in relation to the environment or to know where other objects are in relation to you.
Explosive Strength
The ability to use short bursts of muscle force to propel oneself (as in jumping or sprinting), or to throw an object.
Dynamic Flexibility
The ability to quickly and repeatedly bend, stretch, twist, or reach out with your body, arms, and/or legs.
Night Vision
The ability to see under low light conditions.
Peripheral Vision
The ability to see objects or movement of objects to one's side when the eyes are looking ahead.
Glare Sensitivity
The ability to see objects in the presence of glare or bright lighting.
Sound Localization
The ability to tell the direction from which a sound originated.

Interests

Social
Social occupations frequently involve working with, communicating with, and teaching people. These occupations often involve helping or providing service to others.
Realistic
Realistic occupations frequently involve work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They often deal with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery. Many of the occupations require working outside, and do not involve a lot of paperwork or working closely with others.
Enterprising
Enterprising occupations frequently involve starting up and carrying out projects. These occupations can involve leading people and making many decisions. Sometimes they require risk taking and often deal with business.
Investigative
Investigative occupations frequently involve working with ideas, and require an extensive amount of thinking. These occupations can involve searching for facts and figuring out problems mentally.
Artistic
Artistic occupations frequently involve working with forms, designs and patterns. They often require self-expression and the work can be done without following a clear set of rules.
Conventional
Conventional occupations frequently involve following set procedures and routines. These occupations can include working with data and details more than with ideas. Usually there is a clear line of authority to follow.

Work Style

Dependability
Job requires being reliable, responsible, and dependable, and fulfilling obligations.
Self Control
Job requires maintaining composure, keeping emotions in check, controlling anger, and avoiding aggressive behavior, even in very difficult situations.
Integrity
Job requires being honest and ethical.
Social Orientation
Job requires preferring to work with others rather than alone, and being personally connected with others on the job.
Concern for Others
Job requires being sensitive to others' needs and feelings and being understanding and helpful on the job.
Cooperation
Job requires being pleasant with others on the job and displaying a good-natured, cooperative attitude.
Adaptability/Flexibility
Job requires being open to change (positive or negative) and to considerable variety in the workplace.
Attention to Detail
Job requires being careful about detail and thorough in completing work tasks.
Leadership
Job requires a willingness to lead, take charge, and offer opinions and direction.
Initiative
Job requires a willingness to take on responsibilities and challenges.

Work Values

Achievement
Occupations that satisfy this work value are results oriented and allow employees to use their strongest abilities, giving them a feeling of accomplishment. Corresponding needs are Ability Utilization and Achievement.
Relationships
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to provide service to others and work with co-workers in a friendly non-competitive environment. Corresponding needs are Co-workers, Moral Values and Social Service.
Independence
Occupations that satisfy this work value allow employees to work on their own and make decisions. Corresponding needs are Creativity, Responsibility and Autonomy.
Working Conditions
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer job security and good working conditions. Corresponding needs are Activity, Compensation, Independence, Security, Variety and Working Conditions.
Recognition
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer advancement, potential for leadership, and are often considered prestigious. Corresponding needs are Advancement, Authority, Recognition and Social Status.
Support
Occupations that satisfy this work value offer supportive management that stands behind employees. Corresponding needs are Company Policies, Supervision: Human Relations and Supervision: Technical.

Lay Titles

Accounting Instructor
Accounting Teacher
Adult Education Instructor
Apparel Machinery Instructor
Apparel Manufacture Instructor
Architectural Drafting Instructor
Auto Body Repair Teacher
Auto Mechanics Teacher
Automated Manufacturing Instructor
Automotive Collision Repair Instructor
Automotive Instructor
Automotive Service Management Teacher
Automotive Technology Instructor
Aviation Maintenance (Airframe and Powerplant) Instructor
Barbering Instructor
Barbering Teacher
Beauty Culture Teacher
Bookkeeping Teacher
Building Trades Instructor
Bus, Trolley, and Taxi Instructor
Business Education Instructor
Business Education Teacher
Business Instructor
Business Machines Teacher
CADD Instructor (Computer-Aided Drafting and Design Instructor)
Carpentry Instructor
Certified Nursing Assistant Instructor (CNA Instructor)
Chef Instructor
Clinic Coordinator
Clinical Instructor
Clinical Laboratory Aides Teacher
Commercial Art Instructor
Commercial Baking Teacher
Commercial Food Instructor
Commercial Sewing Instructor
Computer Instructor
Computer Repair Instructor
Computer Systems Technology Instructor (CST Instructor)
Computer Technology Instructor
Continuing Education Instructor
Cooperative Education Coordinator
Corrective Therapy Aide Teacher
Correspondence School Instructor
Cosmetology Instructor
Cosmetology Teacher
Costume Design Teacher
Cpr Instructor
Criminal Justice Instructor
Culinary Arts Instructor
Customer Service Representative Instructor
Customer Service Representative Teacher
Decorating Instructor
Dental Assisting Instructor
Design/Animation Instructor
Dietary Aide Teacher
Drafting Instructor
Drafting Teacher
Driver Trainer
Dry Cleaning Teacher
Electrical Technology Instructor
Electronics Teacher
Electronics Technology Instructor
Faculty Member
Flight Instructor
Floral Design Teacher
Footwear Machinery Instructor
Gericare Aide Teacher
Graphic Design Teacher
Ground School Instructor
Ground Services Instructor
Health Occupations Instructor
Health Science Instructor
Home Care and Home Health Aides Teacher
Hospital Aides and Assistants Teacher
House Painting Instructor

National Wages and Employment Info

Median Wages (2008):
$23.07 hourly, $47,990 annual.
Employment (2008):
121,550 employees